The monsoon settles in

Sometime in the late morning of yesterday I realized that we were going through the first spell of a proper monsoon rain. It had been raining continuously since the previous evening. The earlier part of June had passed in little fits and bursts of rain. That was typical early monsoon; it gives you time to turn the house upside down looking for the umbrella that you put away last September, and the raincoat that you bundled into a drawer. In our part of town July and early August see the maximum rain on average. So the monsoon this year looks like it is textbook weather.

Part of the textbook is this first long and bothersome spell of rain at the very end of June. I had a day full of meetings, which, fortunately, in our new normal, means that you can stay at home glued to the laptop screen. I was glad about that. Otherwise I would have had to make a waterproof bundle with a towel and a change of clothes and shoes to take to work. I kept looking out of the window to see how much the rain pools in the garden. In continuous low-intensity rain like this, water can become ankle high in the garden at high tide, and drain out almost completely when the tide is low. It’s a good proxy for how the trains function. Fortunately for commuters, high tide was not at rush hour.

In the evening, as I took macros of the bougainvillea still in flower on our wet balcony, The Family scrolled through the news and read out the day’s statistics to me. It had rained a steady couple of centimeters every hour. In five hours we’d got a 100 mm of rain, in eight, 165 mm. The day had been dreary, and I’d switched on all the lights at home to make the place look cheerful. A few notes of cheer had been added by the sparrows sheltering on my windowsill, and the pair of purple sunbirds which come to sit on the bougainvillea vines. Now I look out at the first morning of July, and find another dreary day, with the clouds looking all set for another tedious day of rain. I have a meeting today which I can’t do on zoom. Bother!

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By I. J. Khanewala

I travel on work. When that gets too tiring then I relax by travelling for holidays. The holidays are pretty hectic, so I need to unwind by getting back home. But that means work.

13 comments

  1. Your beautiful post reminds of Summer weather in HK as the typhoon season approached & August would be back to back rain. With steamy humidity for months starting in May. Soaked shoes, dehumidifiers, umbrellas & raincoats & 90° humidity, dashing for shelter & shivering in Aircon. I can feel the rain in your post. Lovely. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Our annual rains are here, too. Sometime ago they started calling them a “monsoon”. I’m sorry, but I think YOU should have exclusive right to that word and we should go on with “summer thunder showers” but I’m really not in charge of anything, not even, apparently, my own self.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I learnt a while back that the English word monsoon comes from the Arabic origin word for climate used in many Indian languages: mausam. It refers to the northern shift in the trade winds. I believe your monsoon is also due to a shift in trade winds. So it’s a perfectly reasonable loan word. In any case, words are the best loans one culture can give to another.

      Liked by 1 person

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