MACRO: art in a brewery

In 1901 the Birra Peroni company started building an enormous brewery in a part of Rome just outside the Aurelian walls. Gustavo Giovannoni was the architect who designed the first part of what would eventually become a two-hectare complex of buildings making up the Peroni Brewery. In 1922 Peroni hired Alfredo Palopoli to design the stores and stables which would become the contemporary art museum called MACRO which I walked into in June this year. I’ve been meaning to write about it, but kept putting it off. Partly because I did not know how to talk about the experience.

I found the gallery exactly where it was supposed to be, but had a little problem figuring out where to enter. I came down Via Cagliari and turned into Via Nizza. There was a space at the corner where some people were hanging around before eleven in the morning of a Saturday. There was no entrance visible. I walked around to Via Reggio Emilia and saw a large gate which was closed. I walked back to the corner of Via Cagliari and Via Nizza, and asked the people who I saw there about the entrance. It is at the corner, but not visible from the road. You have to take a path through a little garden to enter the huge vestibule of what turns out to be the new block of the museum. It is very nice, once you find it.

The toilet at the MACRO in Nomentano, Rome

The price of entry is the same as for most museums in Rome, but it seems a little steep once you find that the amount of art on display is not very large. I took it as a visit to an interesting house of mystery. The first part of the puzzle was to find out how to enter the galleries from the central atrium. I found the most exciting toilet in Rome (photo above) quite easily, between the cloak room and the museum shop. The constantly changing colour of lights in the toilet makes it a little hard to register the layout.

Odile Decq designed this, the new part of the museum. The entrance area is dominated by a red polyhedron, which was not in use. A ramp leads into it from near the ticket counter, and seems to be an obvious place to enter. It is not, and entry was forbidden. Eventually I took the lift from near the museum shop. This leads to three floors of interesting, but severely limited selection of, contemporary art. The one exhibit that remains in my mind after a few months was a series of photographs of an artist (whose name I did not note) of himself over the years. Viewed together, it is a stunning work which documents aging: the essence of the human condition. In my mind I put it next to a mental collection of Rembrandt’s self portraits over his own lifetime. The effect is similar.

I found that I’d walked through this space too soon, and entered the old part of the museum. This contains two wings around a courtyard.Zaha Hadid's Bvlgari pavilion in MACRO Nomentano, Rome The courtyard holds Zaha Hadid’s design for Bvlgari’s stall at a trade exhibition. The courtyard connects through a ramp back to the new section. This segment is devoted to the Museum’s collection of Italian modern art. This is again a very small exhibition space, with well-chosen pieces. There was a small special exhibition on, and I sat through a couple of videos. In spite of this I found myself walking back through the contemporary art exhibits soon. I dawdled at the coffee shop, but was back on the street less than two hours from when I’d entered.

In the months between visiting MACRO and getting to write about it, I found an interesting master’s thesis by an architect. Interestingly, it articulated some of the concerns I had, but could not quite put my finger on. The architect has created beautiful spaces which could be used in innovative ways, but the lack of signage and communication makes it hard to use. As a result, you walk through the space without completely experiencing it, and come out feeling unsatisfied.

A little Roman market

Market at Piazza Alessandria viewed from Via AlessandriaA market inside a nice Art Deco brick building in the Piazza Alessandria in the Nomentano district of Rome was an unexpected find. I’d wanted to write about it from the time I stumbled on it in June, but with one thing or another, never got round to it. The Nomentano district is just outside the touristy centre of the city. As a result you hear only Italian in its cafes and restaurants, and see casually dressed families with children comfortably ambling along the streets next to you, very pointedly ignoring your camera.

Walking through a small road, busy at 10 in the morning on a Saturday, I came across a brick building with iron gates sporting the wolf symbol of the city.The market at Piazza Alessandria viewed from Via Ancona I’d not researched this walk at all. But an open gate topped with a frieze of a wolf suckling Romus and Romulus is an invitation to enter. I looked at the building behind it, possibly a renaissance structure, and decided that the invitation in front of me was stronger.

Inside was a busy municipal market. I love markets. Walking through one in Italy is a special treat because the freshness of the produce is a constant reminder of how flavourful the local cuisine is. The Family and I have often joked that we would like to bring back two kilos of tomatoes instead of a bottle of wine from our travels in Italy. I loved the vegetable stalls with their golden pumpkins, the bright leafy greens, cucumbers and carrots (see the featured photo for all of this and more). The sight of Zucchini flowers in a market always remind me of boyhood lunches at my grandmother’s place where an occasional treat was batter-fried pumpkin flowers. This is probably unknown in many parts of India; certainly The Family has never eaten pumpkin flowers, and says she is not brave enough to eat flowers.

Many of the aisles were empty. I did not see any stall selling meats or fishes. Was I too early or too late? I looked longingly at the mushrooms: the yellow trumpets which the French call the Chanterelle stood next to dark brown mushrooms which could have been porcini, and a heap of the common white funghi. Mushrooms and cheese are always special treats for us when we visit Europe because these are two things which India does not have.

Fruits in the market at Piazza Alessandria

The next aisle had a stall which had huge cauliflowers and broccoli. I don’t think I’ve seen broccoli which is so large and bright green. I was tempted to buy some. Unfortunately my time in Italy was almost done, and, as a result, I had plans to eat out with friends on every remaining evening. I could still support farmers by buying fresh fruits. Spring had not yet yielded to summer in this market. I could pick up strawberries and cherries, so I did. The apricots smelt wonderful, so I picked up some. European spring and summer fruits are also special treats for me. Although they are available in India, they play second fiddle to local fruits. As a result, the variety and quality is much superior throughout Europe.

I walked out towards Via Alessandria, where some vendors had set up little kiosks selling clothes and bags. I passed by them and went on to look for some coffee.